Courses

Nina Waisman - IM Installation 5-10-2012

2016-17  IM Requirements

Fall 2016 Course Descriptions

IIMC-500: Conversations on Technology, Media and Practice
Tom Leeser
An overview of the history of art and technology and a series of talks given by visiting artists and writers from various disciplines. The class is designed to promote interaction and dialogue with students around issues of technology, artistic practice and media culture.

IIMC-520: Integrated Media Studio (I)
Tom Jennings

The workshop is an interdisciplinary workshop open to CIM students who are interested in working collaboratively on their Integrated Media project. The workshop will address research, conceptualization, prototyping, new techniques, current digital technologies and collaborative production methods.

IIMC-530: Contexts for Interaction, Performance and Play
Tyler Calkin

This workshop will examine the relationship of live art, interactivity and performance within critical, micro-social, and cultural contexts. We will discuss performance and its development through various related strategies using analog and digital technology. Live events, gameplay, readings, actions, interventions and installations will be considered as contexts for interaction. Throughout the semester we will explore tools and techniques for creating, playing, manipulating and interacting with embodied media in real-time. We will examine both the practical and conceptual implications of developing content within performative and collaborative environments. During the course of the workshop we will produce a collaborative project based on a strategy of indeterminate and interactive hybridity. We will perform the project in the CIM work space in December.

IIMC-670: IM Project Development
Tom Leeser
Chi-wang Yang

Course open to MFA2 Integrated Media students only.   IM Project Development is designed to allow the student concentrated studio time to continue their pursuit of advanced creative and technical practices and research in consultation with their Integrated Media faculty.   It is required for all MFA-2 Integrated Media students. The faculty will meet with the students on a weekly basis to discuss concepts, processes, technologies and critical issues in the continuing development of the student’s required Integrated Media project.

IIMC-560: Sound as Object: Media, Space & Sound                                                                          (not offered in the 21016-17 academic year)                                                                                                 An Integrated Media research and production oriented workshop leading to a collective interactive environment, using experience, performance, text and sound as our material. Contemporary neuroscientific studies, presented in venues ranging from peer-reviewed journals on down to Cosmopolitan magazine bombard us with curious tales of deep connections between mental and physical logics. How are concrete and virtual cultures forming your logic by co-forming your posture, you movements and your stillness? And, as physical computing increasingly embeds itself in our daily activities, what buried physical logics is technology imposing on our minds and bodies? This workshop can be thought of as a think-tank focused on questions and speculations about “physical thinking”. We will exorcise, exercise and mess with some of the ghosts driving our logic machines. We will make one or more collective projects, so please introduce us to your related readings, concerns, projects and skills andwe will see what we can make together. There will be an opportunity to incorporate interactive sound features in the resulting environment/s, object/s and/or performance/s we construct. This workshop will focus on concrete experiences and interactions, more than purely virtual or screenal environments.

MCMP-481: Media Theory: The Interactee                                                                                        Sara Roberts                                                                                                                                                 This class will have both a theoretical and a practical side. The theoretical side will be a consideration of several aspects of the way an audience perceives a work: their most basic cognitive perception; what stays, or stands out in the memory; the work as a matter of interpretation; and the piece or object as something associated with others of its type. The practical side of the class will be making some participatory and installation pieces that test these theories about the audience. The class will include weekly reading, research, and short writing assignments, and three short projects, which the class will discuss in detail.

 

Spring 2017 Course  Descriptions

IIMC-510: Research and Practice Seminar: Media and Culture
Tom Leeser

Section 1 open to MFA1 Integrated Media students only. Section 2 available by Permission of Instructor Only. This seminar is an advanced graduate seminar focusing on topics in history and theory with in-depth analysis and discussion of critical issues inherent in the use of technology in art practice, interdisciplinary collaboration, performance disseminaton and display of work with multiple forms of media. Readings will be used to address the history of interdisciplinary, interactive work and the developments in many fields that have led to the present state of the art. We will be reviewing works by artists that lectures in the “Conversations on Technology, Media and Practice” class, in addition to texts that provide an insight to recent media theory and global networked culture.

IIMC-520: Integrated Media Studio (II)
Tom Jennings

The  workshop is an interdisciplinary workshop open to CIM students who are interested in working collaboratively on their Integrated Media project. The  workshop will address research, conceptualization, prototyping, new techniques, current digital technologies and collaborative production methods.

IIMC-550: SoundGameSpaceVR
Dave Mickey, 
Tyler Calkin

SoundGameSpaceVR is a CIM workshop designed to use strategies of gaming and play theory to investigate interactive sound, movement and the body in virtual space. The workshop will review and research traditional forms of public art, public play space and site specific narrative. There will be an emphasis on examining the translation of public space into digital terrain and changes to private space in our social environments. Virtual social spaces will be examined as a contrast to the physical environment and the social and political issues that arise around the conditions that determine our definitions of the public sphere. We will develop our responses through readings, discussions and through the production of virtual environments and games during the course of the semester. We will also collaborate on a final project for exhibition at the end of the semester.

IIMC-690: Integrated Media Studio/Critique
Chi-wang Yang, IM Faculty
Members of the CIM faculty and fellow students participate in the Integrated Media Studio & Critique. In the fall semester, the students work with the faculty to develop an Integrated Media project. Each week in the spring semester, one student or collaborative team gives a formal presentation of their Integrated Media project to be followed by an extended discussion with the their peers and faculty. This is a rigorous but supportive forum for considering technology-based artworks, and discussing current trends and issues in the field of new media. There will also be opportunities for hands-on workshops and demonstrations of new technology and new media during the fall semester.

IIMC-540: Design Research Group
Tom Leeser
This is an elective class for Integrated Media MFA2 students. This course may be open to students at other year levels, and in other Schools, by Permission of Instructor The class as a group will analyze and critique an Integrated Media Research Project, from the proposal stage through conceptual development, production and to the final output. The students will present their proposal within a critique format to their peers and faculty for feedback and advisement on a weekly basis.

Presentations of research, works-in-progress, technology applications, methodologies and critical analysis will all be a part of the discussions within the class. Upon completion the students will present their IM Research Project and their associated body of work to the class for the final class review.

IIMC-544: Archaeologies of the Present
Tom Leeser
This class is a cross-disciplinary graduate seminar and workshop focusing on our contemporary cultural condition through in-depth analysis, discussion and art making.

Our archaeology of the present essentially begins in 1964, with massive shifts in the role of the nation state, in digital technologies, in biotechnology, in urban planning and in new forms of media production and communication. We’ll trace these shifts and their 20th century origins through the emergence of a 21st century form of neo-feudalism with its risks and potential: new forms of narrative and cultural production, modernism as a ruin and the dismantling of the American psyche.

We will collectively develop various artistic and critical tools in creative research, analysis and historical/geneological investigations. These tools will be introduced to the class and then articulated through student projects and presentations (for example, how to apply methods from anthropology, sociology and social history to the visual arts, cinema, video, social networks, etc.).

We will define the outcomes according to how students apply these content creation tools, to effective discussions, creative prototypes, media presentations and exploratory essays. The students will investigate sociological and historical strategies that will support and may even invalidate their approach to creative practice.

IIMC-580: Philosophical Toys
Tyler Calkin

This course will investigate toy design, philosophy and play as a hybrid art practice. It will focus on the design, production and use of performative objects and the implications of calling them toys. Beginning with a historical perspective, the class will investigate the evolution and classifications of toys and play in culture. We will then negotiate an understanding of interactivity and use-value through Winnicott’s transitional object theory and Baudrillard’s notion of the gizmo.

Toys will be produced using various materials and media through the invention, inversion and invalidation of objects. The role of fantasy and imagination in artmaking and viewership will be prioritized. The trajectory of the class will lead us to toy design as cultural critique. This hands-on course will entail collaboration and individual assignments, punctuated by readings and discussions.